Entries from Jan 2014 ↓

Thanks for Offering to Guest Blog or Advertise, But…

Once again I’m blogging on a topic I’ve previously spent much time covering in email replies. So rather than compose that email reply yet again I’m blogging it for today and for future reference.

TL;DR

Thanks for offering to guest blog or advertise; forgive me though but I’ll have to decline.

Or, If You Want to Know Why:

First, thanks for offering to write a guest post here on my blog, or to pay me to advertise here. I’m honored. But pursuing either of those opportunies is not consistent with my purpose for this blog.

I Blog for Myself

While I do obviously blog, I don’t consider myself an active blogger and I intend for all posts on MikeSchinkel.com to be written by me. My blog is for:

  1. My opinions when I get inspired to attempt to persude on a topic,
  2. To write posts about information I want to remember or refer back to later, or
  3. As in the case of this post, to refer people to read instead of writing the same email reply repeatedly.

I’m Not Interesting in More Blog Traffic

I don’t add content to this blog with a goal of generating more traffic, except for when I’m trying to persude and then only from those I’m trying to persude.

I’d Prefer to Have Fewer Comments to Answer

Plus I’d prefer to get fewer comments rather than more because each comment I get generates a “todo” which if I’m going to answer should be answered in a timely fashion. Even though a guest post wouldn’t require writing on my part, I would have a follow-up obligation to answer comments on the post should the author not, since it’s my blog. These would all become “urgent” todos even though they would almost certainly not be important in the grand scheme, they would still compete for time with my “important” todos that I constantly struggle to find time for (see urgent vs. important.)

For Me, Integrity Trumps Ad Revenue

As for advertising, if I started including advertising then people would immediately assume my goals for this blog are to generate revenue and that might call into question any position I might take on the blog; i.e. was I being paid for my opinion? Since my integrity is far more important to me than any small amount of income I might get in ad revenue I say no to any and all advertising on the blog portion of MikeSchinkel.com.

Including One Means Others Will Expect It Too

Let’s say I allowed one person to guest post or allowed one advertisement on my blog. As soon as I did I’d open myself up to be asked constantly to allow it to happen again, and then I have to craft a personal reply explaining why I said “yes” before but “no” to them. Better to just always say “no” and then nobody’s feeling gets hurt and I don’t have to spend time explaining.

Guest Blogging Begets Confusion

Although this may not apply to other blogs, my blog doesn’t have a design that would make it clear that a guest post wasn’t written by me and people might assume I wrote it. Worse, if the guest post was controversial people think I wrote it could result in a negative fallout for me. But the most obvious thing likely to happen is simply that people will start contacting me in comments, on Twitter or via email for clarification or to offer more guest posts, and that would all translate into more unwanted “todos.”

Bottom Line: I Appreciate the Offer, But No Thanks

And yes I know I’ve had this domain for over a decade and yes it’s probably got traffic and Google visibility that a site launched on a new domain today would covet, and some people see that as a waste of opportunity. But it’s my blog and that gives me the option to choose what gets published here. And I’ve decided I want to keep it non-commercial and only include posts written by me.

I thank you in advance for your understanding.

The Web Needs You To… STOP BLOGGING!

Well, that was an incendiary title. On purpose.

Now that I have your attention, let me say that I don’t literally mean “stop blogging”, I mean to object to the meme that seems to have overtaken the zeitgeist of too many lately. The “You Should Blog Every Day” meme. Here are some of it’s advocates:

As an aside I think somehow the folks at WordPress.com must have used subliminal messaging on their platform to encourage blogging addiction and thus, for them, revenue growth. But I digress…

What’s Wrong with Daily Blogging?

If you’ve read (any) of the posts above you’ve read glowing prose about how and why you should post daily, but none of the counterpoints. Just as we wouldn’t appreciate our neighbors leaving their trash bags on their lawn why do so many people champion other people to churn out non-stop pablum? Where in anyone’s good book has this endeavor been canonized as a virtue?

Lacks Depth

Daily posts are rarely more than opinion, and from what I’ve seen are usually without significant research, or links to related information on the topic. After all, who has the time for any of that when posting daily?

Adds High Noise, Low Signal

Publishing daily adds to the total amount of information out of them web. Let’s just say only 1% of US Citizens, let alone the rest of the world followed the “Blog Every Day” meme; together they would produce 1 trillion posts/year! Do we really need that much more low-information content to contribute to overload on the web?!?

More is Not Better

Daily posts focus on volume and not excellence. Unless you are one of those extremely rare prolific individuals who can be blog daily and write high quality content (and those people are usually known as “professional jounralists”) then posting daily is just setting one’s self up for #fail.

Not that you won’t be able to successful at daily posting, you might, but is daily posting really more beneficial than writing a much higher quality post less frequently?

No Time for Greatness

Similar to the previous, people who blog daily set themeselves up on a treadmill after which they’ll likely never have time to write a truly epic post. Some of the best and most valuable posts I have read on the web have been long form posts that clearly took more than a day to write. Few daily post ever gain continous linkage, at least not from what I’ve seen.

Why Should You Not Want to Blog Daily?

Besides the reasons above not to blog daily, what about selfish reasons for not blogging daily?

Busy People Will Tune You Out

Although I can’t say it’s a completely valid indicator, busier people seem to be the ones who accomplish more. As such, they are a higher value audience most of the time. If you post daily you’ll likely overwhelm people who want to consume your content but simply cannot handle the volume.

Expect More of Yourself

The first question to ask yourself is “What else could you be doing with your time?” If you spend only an hour a day blogging that’s over 9 weeks full time for a year; could you not achieve something better than a slew of blog posts?

If you are a programmer, for example, why not build and release an open-source project? If you are venture capitalist, why not take more meetings with entrepreneurs or use your network to help your existing investments more? If you are a social media maven (really? seriously?) maybe you could use your time to research all the emerging tools for tracking and analysis.

In other words, envision a BHAG project you could complete rather than just writing a new blog post every day. If John F. Kennedy had rallied US citizens around all journaling daily instead, would we ever have ever made it to the moon?

You Are Competing with Millions

If you are blogging about anything that is not highly unique, you are competing with millions.

Consider if you were paid your effective hourly rate for the time you spend blogging; would you invest that money in lottery tickets if you had it in your bank account? If not, why would you compete for the attention of people against so many others who are blogging too?

Life is Too Short

One of the mantras regarding daily posting is that you have to train yourself and develop discipline, which means that for most people blogging daily is just not fun. Why put yourself through that unless you are really going to benefit greatly from it?

But What About the Benefits?

Reading through all of the posts listed above about why you should blog each day it seems that the primary benefits stated are these, paraphrasing of course:

  • Increasing your blog traffic
  • Readers expect it
  • Developing habits are a key to success
  • Establishing yourself as an expert
  • Exercising your “Writing Muscle”

Let me tackle these one-at-a-time, in reverse order:

Exercising your “Writing Muscle”

That’s probably the best reason listed, and I agree. Except.

If it is really important to you to become a better writer, then yes, write every day. But you don’t have to push the “Publish” button, at least not for your public blog. Here are strategies that you could use instead that would excerise that muscle just as much:

  • Write a portion of a longer blog post, and do it every day.
  • Create a Facebook page and write posts for it daily.
  • Write a private journal daily. If you really need/crave feedback, invite friends to access it. But publish your best work less frequently on your blog.

Establishing Yourself as an Expert

This is another good reason. But a weekly blog can be just as successful at establishing your expertise, if not more so.

Look around at some of the leading experts you know via their blogs; how many of them blog daily? I’ve listed at least one below, Mark Suster. His expertise is well established, but he doesn’t blog daily unless he has something to blog about.

Developing Habits are a Key to Success

Agreed. But do you really need to blog daily to develop habits? Aren’t there other habits that can generate a better return in your life? (exercise, to name one?)

Readers Expect It

Sorry, this is just rationalization as far as I’m concerned.

When I was young my father told me:

“Don’t worry what other’s think; they think about you about 1/1000th as often as you think about yourself.” Similarly, most people don’t wait with baited breath for you to generate yet another post.

As for the few people who do tell you they wanted you to blog more (search for “Loyal Readers Crave More Content”) they are just feeding your confirmation bias compared to the majority of your vistors.

Increasing your Blog Traffic

Really, it comes down to this.

Yes, blogging daily is about driving more traffic to your blog, nothing else. And sadly, it works.

If your primary goal is to drive more traffic to your blog but not necessarily higher quality traffic, and the other reasons for not blogging daily are of no concern to you then more power to you. Just please don’t try to fool yourself or convince others that your daily blog ritual is for any other person than yourself.

Sorry to be harsh, but I haven’t seen anything that has given me evidence to believe there’s any other reason for it than self-promotion, and in some cases even narcissism. Maybe you can convince me otherwise in the comments below?

Are There Exceptions?

Of course there are exceptions. The ones who should daily blog (well, actually “write daily”) are professional journalists, you know people who get paid to write daily, and especially those who write news stories, which by definition require daily writing.

Also, anyone who generates highly unique content, such as content about their own company’s products or services could possibly benefit from daily blogging, especially if they have internal content developed by others from which to draw upon.

Effectively anyone who is likely to write content that nobody else is going to write could be forgiven for blogging daily. But even then, less frequently per author is better because then they have the time to write higher quality posts.

Information Overload Redux

When I was in college and learning to love programming computers there was one (1) monthly magazine that covered the programming language I was learning at the time. Each month I would read it cover-to-cover several times, and anxiously await the next issue to start again.

Today, thinking of programming for WordPress, I could spend every waking minute reading good quality articles that would be somehow relevant and informative regarding my current chosen professional. But to find the good articles I’d have to sift through the other 90% of that were published just for publishing sake, the ones that are little more than noise.

Simply put, blogging daily exponentially increases the amount of noise on the web. And that’s really not good for (the users of) the web, or humanity.

Bloggers I Wish Didn’t Post Daily

Speaking of daily bloggers, here is a short list of people who I really respect and admire and who I would love to see write some truly epic posts inspired by their knowledge and experience. Unfortunately each day I find a typically a mediocre post albeit occasionally a few almost good ones. But (almost?) never do these people product really great posts.

Fred Wilson of AVC.com

Fred <@fredwilson> is known as the VC who has funded some of the most visibly successful Internet startups in the past decade. He blogs daily, and I get an email containing his daily posts. Given his daily blogging schedule and all of his other obligations and evident success, I am constantly amazed at how good his posts are.

But more than being amazed, I’m also disappointed because he never blogs long form or in-depth. I know he has great knowledge and experience to share, but I never really feel like I’ve learned something after reading Fred’s blog posts, I just feel like I’ve been kept up to date.

Now Fred’s blog has generated an incredibly active community of commentors. Many of the frequent commentors are well-known and successful people in the startup world, but I constantly amazed at how much time these people can spend commenting on Fred’s blog in a day. It flabbergast me, frankly.

Fred’s blog uses Disqus for commenting, a company he has invested in but one where I find product usability very lacking other than I do really like the ability to edit the typos in my comments, which you can’t do on most blogs. The reason I mention this is that as soon as I comment on Fred’s latest blog I am inundated with about 250 emails that day because Disqus emails every me comment, not just replies to my comments, and Fred’s blog overflows with comments. This is clearly good for Fred’s personal branding and provides him with a posse of people he can ask for help, but then if Fred wasn’t an uber-successful VC I doubt he would get the same following from his daily blog.

After all, people are attracted to where the money is…

David Cummings on Startups

David <@davidcummings> is an incredibly talented individual. He’s a “local boy done good”; he built and then in late 2012 sold Pardot for $90 million to ExactTarget, which was then sold to Saleforce.com. Almost immediately after be purchased a 100,000 SQFT building in Buckhead, Atlanta’s prime real estate market, a.k.a where old money lives and new money parties.

David christened his new Buckhead facility Atlanta Tech Village, now home to 100’s of startups. He has become a well-known ambassador in town for high tech startups and has receive the attention of the USA Today, the Mayor of Atlanta Kasim Reed, the Atlanta Journal/Constitution, Atlanta’s Creative Loafing, InvestAtlanta, the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and more.

I think 20 years from now Atlanta will look back at David as the father of Atlanta’s High Tech Industry Boom, or something similar. When I tell people about David who don’t know of him I say his is Atlanta’s future equivalent of Brad Feld re: Bolder, Colorado.

CLEARLY David is amazing, one of the best business thinkers in Atlanta. And he blogs daily, and yes I get an email for every one of his posts. Unfortunately David’s posts are short and rarely ever better than a high-level outline of some topic that he has clearly queued up for the day. I receive his post via email, like clockwork, around 10pm ever night.

David has so much value to share, and he obviously devotes the time to sharing. But unfortunately David’s choice of daily bloggingmeans that he rarely if ever (has the time to) write a really valuable, in-depth post that leverages his profound knowledge, experience and expertise. For example, David frequently mentions the importace of establishing a great company culture but he’s never blogged anything that helps a would-be entrepreneur know how to establish a great culture in a startup.

Such as shame, really.

Tom McFarlin

Tom <@tommcfarlin> is one of the sharpest guys in the WordPress space, if not the sharpest WordPress guy I know personally.

Tom is also incredibly prolific. He blogs nonstop it seems, constantly writes for Envato, he’s written numerous plugins listed on WordPress.org, he gets profiled frequently, he was a partner at 8Bit which used to sell the Standard Theme he helped develop, and he was a contributor to their WPDaily blog, which is no more.

Anyway, I tried to follow Tom’s blog for a while and periodically he had some incredibly valuable posts. Unfortunately they were interspersed with numerous opinion and/or low information posts many of which generated a lot of comments but few if any dispensed any real usable knowledge, at least for me. It’s as if he set himself a goal to write daily, so by gosh that’s what he is going to do.

Sadly, I had to unsubscribe because the noise-to-signal ratio was just so high. And that made me sad, but I had to do it.

Honorable Mention: Eric Mann

I got to know Eric <@ericmann> during the time I was actively involved in moderating and answering questions on WordPress Answers. While I learned that Eric is a very bright WordPress developer with lots of relevant experience and a great ability to explain answers to WordPress questions in writing, what I admired the most about him was how even-keel he was when interacting with others on the web. Never did I see Eric involved in a flameware (unlike me, unfortunately) nor have I ever witnessed him talking down to someone online, a behavior that otherwise runs rampant online, especially in certain open-source circles. Eric really has my respect.

And when Eric blogs a how-to article about WordPress, it’s usually well worth reading, at least for me. I know Eric has interest in writing a novel, and recently it seems Eric has decided to blog every day (if I misunderstood Eric, please forgive.) My criticisms are not of his posts so much as a knowledge he wants to blog daily and I fear we’ll see more quanitity and less quality.

As an aside, it was actually that comment exchange which triggered me to finally write this post rather than just repeatedly think this sadness I feel when faced with the daily blogging of others who blog posts I would love to read, albeit not daily.

Awesome Bloggers Who Don’t Post Daily

Conversely, here are a few of my (current) favorite bloggers. They seem to only post when they have time and inspiration, but their posts are almost uniformly excellent. When I think of these people I don’t think of how much pablum they have churned out, I only think of how much I am in awe of them.

Mark Suster of Both Sides of the Table

Mark’s <@msuster> blog tagline is “Entrepreneur turned VC” and his experience just exudes from his posts. From my perspective Mark is a VC on par with Fred Wilson albeit he’s not been a VC as long thus he hasn’t had the time to rack up an equivalent number of successes. But like Fred he writes for entrepreneur’s benefit and is clearly not a VC who thinks the best way to win is to take advantage of startup entrepreneurs. Both he and Fred write as if the best entrepreur-VC relationship is a win-win relationship, and that’s why I think both of them has gained so much attention.

Whenever one of Mark’s posts arrives in my email I think “I need to make time to read that, because I know it will be worth reading.” And 9 times out of 10, it is relevant to me and my interests in startups and provides me with significant insight or understanding that I would struggle to find published elsewhere.

Kudos to Mark, he’s my favorite blogger and I would love to have the opportunity to meet him in the future under circumstances where I have something of benefit to offer him.

Price Intelligently

I don’t know who actually blogs for Price Intelligently <@priceintel> but their posts are almost consistently excellent. They blog more frequently than Mark Suster, which surprises as they are able to keep up the quality, but if you care about optimizing pricing for a SaaS then this a must-read blog.

And I’m really glad they don’t try to do the daily thing.

April Dunford of RocketWatcher

Contrary to the rest of this post, I really wish that April <@aprildunford> would blog more. I think she’s like me; she’ll get a burst of inspiration and write a few posts, and then she’ll get busy and 6 months will have gone by with no new posts.

I don’t know April well but she’s got a startup marketing blog, and it’s excellent. When she posts.

Nuff said.

At Least I’m not the Only One

Finally it seems these people agree with me, at least somewhat:

One Final Takaway

So if you are contemplating the development of a daily blogging habit, please consider this the summarization of the above:

  • Choose Quality Over Quantity

 

-Mike

P.S. I do get the irony of my blogging on this topic. But since it’s contrarian in nature I think it counts as unique. One thing’s for sure; I could not write posts like this every day.

Tags: ,

Who Do You Recommend to Design a WordPress Website?

Here’s an email I got a few days ago from someone I met at a Meetup about 6 months ago:

Hi Mike,

I have a friend looking for setting up a non-profit website and they want to use WordPress. I was wondering if you’d be able to help with this, or if not if you know of someone you can recommend who does WordPress website design? My friend needs mostly graphics work, but also need help setting up their WordPress site. They already have the logo and the content. Their budget for this is around US$1000.

- Thanks!

Déjà Vu

I get an email similar to the above about once a week on average. It seems I’ve become branded in the eyes of many people in Atlanta as "The WordPress Guy" even though I don’t do what most people think of when they think of "People who do WordPress"; i.e. I don’t design nor do I build WordPress-based websites[1].

<sigh> :)

Pay it Forward

But when someone asks for help I really do want to help.

I’d never fault anyone for not knowing that I’m the wrong person to ask. And I also wouldn’t fault someone who doesn’t know how much it costs to hire a WordPress specialist; if someone is not a immersed in the web world how could they know?

No More 1-off Emails

Still, I’ve written a response to this type of email more times than I care to count. Speaking of, a few days ago a blog post by Eric Mann inspired me to stop replying long form to emails and to start writing blog posts instead.

So here goes.

A Custom Website Design for US$1000?

Let’s talk about that US$1000 budget. In the Atlanta area we have over ten (10) Fortune 500 companies and as a result we probably have over 100 digital agencies, all directly or indirectly serving those large companies as well most of the midsize companies in the area. Good graphic designers are in high demand here, and they are used to being very well paid. I’m not sure, but I expect the same is true in most major US cities as well.

For US$1000 it might be reasonable to expect to three (3) design comps for your future website’s home page. But it’s highly unlikely you’ll find a quality designer to generate a custom design for an entire site, encode the design into HTML+CSS, convert the code it into a WordPress theme, install WordPress at a hosting company, research, select and then install the various WordPress plugins needed for the features desired, and finally configure everything, all the while taking input from a client who is likely to constantly question aspects of the implementation. All for only US$1000.

And the previous paragraph assumes you can even find someone with the skill to do all those things rather than needing to find a team or to assemble a team of different skills to build the site.

Of course you might get really lucky and find a student from SCAD, Creative Circus, Art Institute, or Portfolio Center who would be willing to build your website for US$1000, assuming your student has already worked extensively with WordPress as a hobby.

So like I said, you might get really lucky…

What Should My Website Cost?

But what price is reasonable to expect?

Those who build WordPress websites know the "How Much?" question can be a landmine. Quoting a price too early can get a WordPress sitebuilder into hot water. I’ve seen WordPress websites cost between free – self-serve at WordPress.com – and US$500k or more. How can a site builder know how to price a website prior to fully understanding its requirements?

Price really depends on both what the client needs as well as what the client wants/expects. And the latter is rarely consistent with the former. For example, does a divorce attorney’s website really need a Flash-based header showing storm clouds, and lightning strikes on hover?!? (yes, that is an actual client request, no demand, that I heard from one of my friends who is a sitebuilder.)

WHICH IS WHY I LOVE this website price calculator:

It was built by Erik Wolf who runs ZeroG Creative. It walks a wannabe website client through a series of questions that help the prospect understand some of the things can affect price and by what magnitude.

Here are some of the questions:

  • "Are you planning on hiring a designer/firm?"
  • "How many people will be involved in the decision-making process?",
  • "Will your website require eCommerce?",
  • "Will your site require social media integration?", and
  • "Will you need a dynamic photo gallery that you can update yourself?".

Depending on the options selected Erik’s price calculator generates prices between US$500 and US$16,500, where for $500 you basically get a site and theme installed, nothing more. And for small business websites I’d say that’s pretty close although frankly I’d expect more like US$1000 and US$25,000.

What About Non-US People?

Note those prices above are for US-based WordPress developers.

And yes, you can pay significantly less to have a WordPress site built by someone outside the USA. But it’s also possible that you will pick the wrong person and that person will either not deliver or will deliver something that doesn’t match your expectation after your entire budget has been spent.

Offshoring can work great for certain type of projects if you have the luxury to pay to try numerous people to find the one that really meets your needs. But if you have only enough budget to try one person, your taking a big risk with your money. And you’ll have no recourse if they fail you.

So caveat emptor if you hire your web developer off Elance.

Agency Projects for Large Companies

By the way, if you are trying to determine the cost of a WordPress website for your Fortune 500 employer expect that your site will cost between US$100k and US$500k.

Why the huge difference in price between small business websites and large business websites? In a word, "Expectations."

More specifically, because of their collective need to see exhaustive design variations, their need to allow your numerous stakeholders to control and approve every detail, their insistence that unrealistic deadlines be met, their expectation that every aspect is perfect upon first preview of features, their desire for constantly scheduling unnecessary and unproductive meetings, and their IT department’s insistence upon using a hosting company that has no expertise in WordPress and no desire to learn it.

But I digress.

But Do You Really Need a Designer?

Considering the budget of US$1000, maybe a "Website Designer for graphics work" is not really what is needed. Maybe what they need is a what I like to call a "Site Builder."

A Site Builder is a jack-of-all-trades and master of none, with respect to WordPress. This is someone who can setup a web host, install and configure WordPress, select an off-the-shelf theme and tweak it to incorporate the logo, and finally add and configure various plugins to add functionality such as email signup forms, social media integration and optimization for SEO.

To further illustrate the difference between a Designer and a Site Builder I roughly categorize WordPress skills as one of these where many people having more than one (1), but rarely more than two or three:

  • User/Author (Content writer)
  • Layout/Graphic Designer (Photoshop)
  • HTML Coder (HTML+CSS)
  • Themer (WordPress Themes)
  • Front-End Developer (Javascript/AJAX Developer)
  • Back-End Developer (PHP/MySQL/Plugin Developer) <– This is me
  • and finally Site Builder (Installs/Configures/Adds a Theme and Plugins)

So for a US$1000 budget I think it’s realistic to find a US-based consultant who can deliver a basic website, assuming the client understands the limitations of using off-the-shelf themes and plugins, i.e. but no custom design and custom PHP or Javascript code. It’s a lot like buying a car; you might not like the wood-trim dash but if you chose a model that only comes with a wood-trim dash, that’s what you get.

Other WordPress Specialties?

I tend to want to make my lists exhaustive, so in that vein I might as well list these specialties too, for the record:

  • eCommerce Specialist - Expertise in online retail and payment processing
  • SEO Specialist - Optimizes for search engines
  • Security Specialist - Reviews code for security holes
  • Performance Specialist - Helps developer improve performance
  • Hosting Specialist - Configures servers for high scalability

What are Off-the-Shelf Themes?

Yeah, I threw that bit of jargon in there when I mentioned Off-The-Shelf Themes. If you are not familiar with this term it refers to packages of design and code that you can purchase from 3rd party vendors that, once installed will update the look and feel of your WordPress-based website.

In it’s 10 years WordPress has spawned a large number of commercial theme vendors, more than 100, although the vast majority of themes are probably sold by 10 or fewer vendors.

Look for an Existing Theme.

If you need a website and your budget is small I’d recommend you surf the main theme vendors websites to find a theme you could envision your future site using. If you can find one that meets all your needs, your low budget website might just be able to be reality.

The following list are the theme vendors I know the best, in alpha order (if you are a fan of another theme vendor feel free to list in the comments.):

But Don’t Expect Significant Changes

Please do realize though it is very difficult for a Site Builder, Graphic Designer or even HTML Coder to make more than trivial changes to the look-and-feel of an off-the-shelf theme without a huge expense. Themes can be very complex beasts and it often takes as long for someone to learn how to modify someone else’s theme than it does to create one from scratch.

So please don’t put your Site Builder in the position of having to explain to you why your "simple change" is really a very time-consuming and labor intensive task (that they will have to bill you for, if they will even agree to do it.) Instead, have them explain to you what is easy and what is hard and then only ask them to do the easy (and inexpensive) things. Your willingness to appreciate their efforts will keep them wanting to service you in the future when you need additional support.

Finally, Who Do I Recommend?

So who do I recommend to build your WordPress-based small business website here in Atlanta? Frankly in good faith I can’t recommend anyone. Why? Because I’ve never worked on a team building a small business website before so any recommendations I would make would really just be me telling you who I know.

That said, I can tell you who I know that specializes in building WordPress websites, in the Atlanta area. Here they are, listed in order of how well I know them (note: I believe all of these have minimum fees higher than US$1000):

There are a lot of others I know outside of Atlanta, but most of the requests I get are from people in Atlanta and thus I’m listing those I know who serve my local area.

And yes I know, it’s a potential faux pas for me to create this list as I’ve most certainly forgotten someone; if it was you who I have forgotten please accept my profuse apology and leave a comment with your contact information below.

Friends, Family or DIY?

Finally, if you or your friend cannot find a WordPress specialist to build your website within your budget, maybe you can find a friend or family member who can help? WordPress powers almost 20% of the web so that means you probably already know a friend of a friend at least who has set up their own WordPress website and can help you get your site going. Ask on Facebook, maybe?

If you are a non-profit, as above, maybe you can find someone passionate about your non-profit’s mission who knows how to set up a WordPress site; they might be willing to work for significantly below market rates.

And if all else fails, do it yourself. It really is possible for a reasonably intelligent person with moderate computer skills to install and configure WordPress; it just takes a bit of stick-to-it-iveness and lots of Google searches to figure out how to do it and launch it yourself.

Anyway, hope this helps.

-Mike Schinkel
WordPress Platform Architect

Footnotes:

  1. Instead of designing and building small business websites I architect and build products based on WordPress for software companies and agencies. I call myself a "WordPress Platform Architect." My focus is very narrow and as such I don’t develop the experience needed to build websites for small businesses. I can’t help select a theme and I don’t know which plugins work best. And I’m as far from being a designer as any web person has the potential to be. But if you want to use WordPress to implement a complex site and need a specialist to architect if for your team to then perfect, I’m your guy.