The Roadkill of the Web 2.0 Era!

Lately I’ve become be very interested in Web 2.0 with particular interest in Mashup development. Microformats, REST-based web services using RSS and/or Atom that empower mashup development, and Building APIs for the web. The concept that the web can finally start evolving into a programmable set of services and data instead of just electronic brochures and self-service applications really energizes me!

On the other hand, even though I am incredibly excited about this trend, I’m frustrated by how few companies are actually doing it!  Very few business people have thus far gotten that “Aha!” moment where they realize what so many technologists instinctively understand; the business benefits of opening up data and systems as web services on the Internet can be vast!

Even with such highly successful companies as Google and Yahoo freely sharing so much of their data via REST-based web services, and Amazon driving significant revenue1 from it’s pennies-per-transaction SOAP and REST-based web services, most business people I speak to either just don’t get it! Or worse, they are either scared to death of it or convinced it makes absolutely no sense!

Well all I can say is that old saw will definitely be true: “What you don’t know can hurt you!” The late majority to this game (and even some of the early majority) that continue not to get it, avoid it in fear, or just plain out deny it are going to become the Roadkill of the Web 2.0 Era

1 Significant for such an early stage

Great People and Old Friends at VS Connections

I just got back from the Visual Studio Connections conference in Orlando, Florida for a few days. I went down for a few meetings, and had a really great time.  

I meet Robert Green who on Monday night previewed a free set of soon to be released components called the VBPowerPack. Robert and I talked about why VS 2005 may actually even be better and easier for the newbie than VB6. And I met Joe Binder the program manager for the very cool “My“ namespace feature, who sold me even more on the feature.

I had a nice long chat with one of the nicer guys in the industry, Alex Homer, author of *ton* of books on ASP, ADO, ASP.NET, ADO.NET, and more, and he told me about the three (3!) book projects on which he’s currently working. His Advanced ASP.NET sounds really interesting and I can’t wait to get a copy.

I had a chance to talk briefly with Rocky Lhotka, another one of the nicest guys in the industry and another hugely prolific ASP/.NET writer, and he did his best to get the concept of SOA thru my thick skull. But rather than give you his explanation, which was great, I’ll give him the chance to first blog about it. I finally met Markus Egger whose Code Magazine just keeps getting better and better.  I also finally met Steve Smith of AspAlliance, but somehow we got our wires crossed and never got a chance to talk; sorry about that Steve. Hope to see you at the next show.

I had a nice long catch-up chat with Shirley Brothers, president and founder of the Connections Conferences. I’ve been a hermit for a lot of reasons and we hadn’t spoken in probably four years. Penton acquired her company over three years ago and it turned out to be a great acquisition. I’m really happy for her because it so often turns out to be a nightmare for the acquired. Anyway, her conferences keep getting more attendees each year, and the attendees, speakers, and vendors I spoke with were really positive.  Rene Garcia, president of SoftwareFX and a leading vendor of one of Xtras.Net said he loved it.  One thing’s for sure; Shirley knows how to pick the venue! The Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress resort beats the heck out most conference hotels I’ve been to over the years.

I had a really nice dinner Monday with Kathleen Dollard, MVP and author of Code Generation in Microsoft .NET, and later on Tuesday we talked about many fine philosphical points, at least a few of which did involve programming and code generation! And then there’s one of the most consistently positive people in the .NET world: Don Kiely. They ran him ragged with three sessions [UPATE: make that five sessions!] but he still kept smiling.

So much for the name dropping. :)  Traveling can be a real pain, but whenever I go to Microsoft-oriented developer conferences I’m always surrounded by great people and lots of old friends.  This time was no different. 

Lhotka: SOA a Big Train Wreck Just Waiting to Derail

Rocky Lhotka has some sobering things to say about the hype surrounding Service Oriented Architectures, or SOA. He says SOA is about crossing trust boundaries but thinks (consultants will counsel) people to use it within apps and replace their tiers with SOA concepts. This he says will cause huge problems:

SOA is going to cost a lot of people a lot of money, and it will make a lot of other people a lot of money. … Who loses money? The clients who buy the hyped products, or fall for the huge consulting price tags due to FUD or the overall hype of SOA.

He then goes on to say SOA is a “big train wreck just waiting to derail.”  As usual Rocky is prescient and pragmatic.  He closes with four keys thoughts in his attempt to keep that train from derailing.